Taoglas Media Center

Articles featuring Taoglas are shown below.

May 2018

18

Autonomous Vehicle

Dual-band antenna, receiver technology driving autonomous vehicle market to scale

The autonomous vehicle market receives its fair share of hype for its potentially huge market size, but it might be small GPS antennas and receivers that push the market closer to reality. In the autonomous industry, precision location—down to the centimeter level—is everything. Reaction time and safety issues are critical; the vehicle’s absolute location must be known at all times, which requires more sophisticated technology than what the market has seen thus far. Autonomous Vehicle with Taoglas antennas_edited.compressed

Reliable, secure connectivity has been one hurdle to overcome, and the industry is moving closer to that with today’s existing LTE (Long Term Evolution) networks and oncoming 5G (fifth generation) networks, plus extra availability of GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) satellites with higher gain signals. But it’s the emerging technology advances in GNSS receivers and high-quality antenna systems that will enable centimeter-level positioning and, in turn, the autonomous revolution.

Current location solutions use the GPS (Global Positioning System) L1 band in the 1500-1600 MHz range. However, if you’ve ever heard the words “recalculating” as you’re trying to navigate on highways or city streets, you know that standard locations capabilities aren’t precise enough for autonomous vehicles. These errors are caused by ever-changing signal delays in the atmosphere. By listening to signals from the same satellite systems (such as the Galileo, GLONASS, and BeiDou) at more than one frequency (commonly referred to as L1, L2, and L5 GPS frequencies), these errors can be removed. With the combination of a multi-constellation and -frequency receiver, and high-performance, low-profile antennas that are able to cover multiple bands, location can be accurately reached within a few centimeters.

How we got here
When GPS was developed by the U.S. military in the 1970s, a lot of thought was put into understanding how to get very good location accuracy of the receiver. One of the keys to achieving best performance was understanding the effects of ionospheric delay and refraction effects. From empirical testing came a model, and from that model came a solution for removing the effects and resulting error from the computation of a GPS receiver’s location. That solution was to send a GPS signal on two separate frequencies.

When the system was built, all its transmissions were encoded such that only U.S. military equipment could decode them. Since 1983, the GPS L1 signal has been sent un-encoded, allowing civilian use of the GPS system. It’s interesting to note that encryption of the whole GPS system can be turned on again at any time by order of the U.S. president.

Dan Michael, Director of Automotive, Taoglas, wrote this article for AVT
Dan Michael, Director of Automotive, Taoglas, wrote this article for AVT
The L1 GPS signal is sent on a center frequency of 1575.42 MHz. The original L2 signal, however, which is sent at 1227.6 MHz, was historically always encrypted. Because of the original encryption on L2, civilian GPS receivers have only listened to the single L1 transmission. That limitation of only being able to use L1 is why civilian GPS receiver accuracy is generally limited to an RMS value of around 3 m. There are multiple modulated signals on each of these frequencies that a GPS receiver can receive. As the GPS system has been modernized, additional signals have been added to the existing frequencies for civilian use, as well as a third transmission called L5 at 1176.45 MHz.

These additional civilian signals on L2 and L5 set the stage for civilian GPS receivers able to achieve similar accuracies to military GPS receivers. However, dual-band GPS receivers from the beginning of their availability have been expensive, limiting their application to things that can clearly justify the additional cost.

Economies of scale
Autonomous vehicles, with their complex, integrated systems of a variety of sensors, will change all that.

Production vehicles will include sonar, radar, LiDAR, infrared and visible light machine vision, and—of course—dual-band GPS. The mass-production scale of vehicles in general, autonomous or not, is driving the cost of dual-band GPS receivers down dramatically. Major commercial GPS receiver manufacturers will be deploying new lines of dual-band GPS receivers within the next year or so.

While dual-band receivers will likely still sell at a significant price premium to L1-only units, they will still be orders of magnitude cheaper than they have been historically. This, in turn, enables new business models that rely on centimeter-level absolute position accuracy far beyond autonomous vehicles.

The trucking industry will likely adopt autonomous vehicles first. In the near future, we’ll see such trucks, specially marked or even lighted, rolling along at about 45 mph (72 km/h) or so on our major highways. (Trucks only go faster than that because drivers can only drive for a specific period of time.) This relatively low speed saves a lot of fuel (or energy, if they’re electric) and, if you’re not paying a driver by the hour or worried they’ll fall asleep, slower speeds extend range, save money, and generally make good business sense.

Diesel-powered trucks will house larger fuel tanks specifically to extend point-to-point range. However, there will be situations where even such a truck would need to refuel, and out of that, we’ll likely see a new kind of gas station as well. Envision automated fueling islands where the truck parks in a specific spot and indicates it needs fueling. Of course, initially a human will likely need to come out and fill that tank, but eventually, this will be replaced by an automated fueling system where the truck has an industry-standard fueling interface. Perhaps that interface supports both electric and chemical fueling.

And what about that truck driver? For the highway, there will likely not be a driver. Where the driver will come into play is getting that truck from the industrial park warehouse, through town, and out to the highway. But that’s where they get out and head back to the warehouse. The truck drives off into the horizon by itself. Hours later, that truck gets to its exit, where it stops and calls for a driver, who drives that truck to its final destination. Driving a heavy truck through tight, highly populated areas will continue to be best addressed by a human. But now that human sleeps in their own bed after work instead of in a cab at a truck stop.

While dual-band receivers and antennas will help drive precision accuracy that will benefit several industries such as manufacturing, construction, agriculture, and others, it’s the autonomous vehicle industry that will drive the costs down and push the technology forward for everyone.

This article was written by Dan Micheal, Director of Automotive at Taoglas for the Autonomous Vehicle Technology Magazine, May 2018.

View Taoglas Automotive Antennas

November 2017

23

Commercial UAV News

HEX / Taoglas Antenna Collaboration Helps Navigate a Clear Course in Crowded Drone Field

The anticipated growth of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones) through 2020 highlights the necessity of reliable, fault-resilient flight control and navigation. The 2016 worldwide market for drone shipments exceeded 2.2 million, according to Gartner, totaling $4.5 billion in sales. Looking ahead, Goldman Sachs is predicting a $100 billion drone market by 2020, fueled by growing demand from the commercial and civil government sectors.

October 2017

13

HIT Infrastructure

Successful Medical IoT Requires Cellular Connections

Each medical IoT device has an antenna that connects the device to the healthcare network, Taoglas Co-Founder and Co-CEO Dermot O’Shea told told HITInfrastructure.com in a previous interview.

“Most organizations use cellular because it’s the only reliable way to really communicate with the devices,” O’Shea explained. “If you’re only using WiFi then you’re relying on the user, patient or caregiver to do all the WiFi connectivity in terms of selecting the WiFi network and putting in the password.”

Cellular networks give wireless networks a break from IoT devices passing into and out of the premises. Cellular networks also let devices keep the same connection as it travels from place to place, without having to disconnect and reconnect to various wireless networks.

Furthermore, the cellular option provides relief for on-premises network deployments by taking on much of the IoT traffic during peak hours, which would otherwise slow down the network.

“Cellular is more robust in an environment,” continued O’Shea. “It’s never a problem if too many people are using cellular to log onto the network like it is with WiFi. That’s often the problem in a hospital. There’s too many people using the network at the same time and it slows down the network. “

12

Wireless Design & Development

Connected Cars Place New Demands on Vehicle Electronics Design

March 2017

14

GPS World

GNSS plays prominent role at Mobile World Congress

January 2017

18

IT Business Edge

Antenna Technology Continues Fast Evolution

11

Internet of Things Today

The Ongoing IoT Conundrum: Who’s Going to Pay?

11

Antenna Systems & Technology

The Ongoing IoT Conundrum: Who’s Going to Pay?

09

The Fast Mode

2017 Forecast: 5G Preparation Continues, While IoT Business Cases Solidify

05

IoT Institute

In 2017, IoT Is Still the Next Big Thing in Healthcare

04

IoT Agenda (TechTarget)

IoT predictions 2017: Revenue, data, latency issues top the list

04

IoT Now

IoT costs will fall this year benefiting consumers in healthcare and utility sectors, says Taoglas CEO

03

Wireless Week

Wireless Week’s Top 5 Predictions for 2017

December 2016

28

RCR Wireless

2017 Predictions: 5G and the IoT – what does this mean for antennas?

20

Embedded Computing Design

In 2017, antennas will play an integral role in the success of the IoT

January 2016

25

Silicon Republic

Ireland holds the aces – and chips – to win big in industrial internet of things

23

RCR Wireless News

Test and Measurement: New IoT test center opens in San Diego

23

Silicon Republic

The Irish high kings of the internet of things

22

The San Diego Union Tribune

Taoglas expands IoT design center in San Diego

22

Sunday Business Post

Enniscorthy to San Diego via Taiwan: the internet-of-things NCT

22

IPV6.NET

Irish tech firm Taoglas invests $2m in San Diego Internet of Things centre

22

Telecompaper

M2M firm Taoglas opens test facility in San Diego

22

SocialTech.com

Taoglas Expands In San Diego, Plans Hiring

22

TechCentral.ie

Taoglas cuts ribbon on $2m test centre in San Diego

22

Yahoo Finance

Taoglas Opens IoTx in San Diego, North America’s First Antenna & RF Design Center for M2M and Internet of Things Devices

22

Business Wire

Taoglas Opens IoTx in San Diego, North America’s First Antenna & RF Design Center for M2M and Internet of Things Devices

22

RTE

Irish tech company Taoglas opens new centre in US

22

Independent.ie

Wexford company Taoglas opens ‘first of its kind’ $2m facility in San Diego

21

Silicon Republic

Irish tech firm Taoglas invests $2m in San Diego internet of things centre

October 2015

02

Reuters

Taoglas Establishes Design and Support Location in Munich and Strengthens Team in Germany

March 2015

17

Electronic Products

Avnet Electronics Marketing expands antenna and cable offering in Americas with Taoglas USA, Inc. deal

February 2015

16

Machine2Machine Magazine

Avnet expands M2M antenna offering in Americas

With Taoglas as part of our available product portfolio, we can help our mutual customers speed their development of these next-generation connected devices.

13

Electronic Products and Technology

Avnet expands antenna, cable offering with Taoglas deal

12

EFY Times

Avnet Electronics Marketing Expands Antenna And Cable Offering In Americas With Taoglas USA, Inc. Deal

12

Display Plus

Avnet Electronics Marketing expands antenna and cable offering in Americas with Taoglas USA deal

11

Electronic Purchasing Strategies

How Distribution Can Capitalize on the IoT

10

evertiq

Avnet expands antenna and cable offering in with Taoglas USA

10

IHS Electronics 360

IoT Components Vendor Inks Distribution Deal with Avnet

10

Electronic Engineering Journal

Avnet Electronics Marketing Expands Antenna and Cable Offering in Americas with Taoglas USA, Inc. Deal

09

Display Plus

Taoglas launches cellular amplifier for M2M, including utility and metering market

08

EE Herald

850MHz and 1900 MHz PCS amplifier for boosting signals

06

Energy Business Review

Taoglas introduces cellular amplifier for North American frequency bands

04

Info Tech Spotlight

Taoglas Launches Cellular Amplifier for M2M, Including Utility and Metering Market

October 2014

13

GoMo News

GoMo 1-to-1 at CTIA: Taoglas on WiMax and LTE impact

September 2014

26

Product Design and Development

Off-the-Shelf 4-in-1 Wi-Fi Antenna from Taoglas

23

Product design & development

Taoglas Launches Iridium Certified Spartan M2M Smart Antenna Transceiver

15

RF Design

LTE Advanced True 2×2 MIMO Embedded Antenna Enabled by Revolutionary New Taoglas Gemini Solution

11

Wireless Design Magazine

Embedded 4X4 MIMO Antenna for IoT and M2M

10

M2M Now!

Taoglas unveils first embedded 4X4 MIMO antenna for IoT and M2M applications

09

Veooz

LTE Advanced True 2×2 MIMO Embedded Antenna Enabled by Revolutionary New Taoglas Gemini Solution

08

Enhanced Online News

LTE Advanced True 2×2 MIMO Embedded Antenna Enabled by Revolutionary New Taoglas Gemini Solution

08

Boston.com

LTE Advanced True 2×2 MIMO Embedded Antenna Enabled by Revolutionary New Taoglas Gemini Solution

08

Market Watch

LTE Advanced True 2×2 MIMO Embedded Antenna Enabled by Revolutionary New Taoglas Gemini Solution

08

Business Wire

LTE Advanced True 2×2 MIMO Embedded Antenna Enabled by Revolutionary New Taoglas Gemini Solution

07

Veooz

LTE Advanced True 2×2 MIMO Embedded Antenna Enabled by Revolutionary New Taoglas Gemini Solution

05

Your News Ticker

Specialists Taoglas created the first embedded antenna 4 x 4 MIMO for the Internet of things

05

RF Design

Taoglas launches the new FXP534 5.8 GHz 802.11ac WiFi 4×4 MIMO ultra-high bandwidth antenna

05

Electronic Engineering Journal

Taoglas Unveils First Embedded 4X4 MIMO Antenna for IoT and M2M Applications that Delivers High Speed Wi-Fi Throughput

04

Financial Content

Taoglas Unveils First Embedded 4X4 MIMO Antenna for IoT and M2M Applications that Delivers High Speed Wi-Fi Throughput

04

Market Watch

Taoglas Unveils First Embedded 4X4 MIMO Antenna for IoT and M2M Applications that Delivers High Speed Wi-Fi Throughput

04

Enhanced Online News

Taoglas Unveils First Embedded 4X4 MIMO Antenna for IoT and M2M Applications that Delivers High Speed Wi-Fi Throughput

04

Boston.com

Taoglas Unveils First Embedded 4X4 MIMO Antenna for IoT and M2M Applications that Delivers High Speed Wi-Fi Throughput

04

Yahoo Finance

Taoglas Launches Iridium Certified Spartan M2M Smart Antenna Transceiver

04

Wall Street Select

Taoglas Launches Iridium Certified Spartan M2M Smart Antenna Transceiver

04

Financial Content

Taoglas Launches Iridium Certified Spartan M2M Smart Antenna Transceiver

04

Market Watch

Taoglas Launches Iridium Certified Spartan M2M Smart Antenna Transceiver

“All-in-One” Iridium Short Burst Data (SBD) Transceiver With Taoglas Antenna Housed in a Single Robust Enclosure for Asset Management and Remote Monitoring.

04

Power Engineering

Taoglas Launches Iridium Certified Spartan M2M Smart Antenna Transceiver

04

Electronic Engineering Journal

Taoglas Launches Iridium Certified Spartan M2M Smart Antenna Transceiver

04

Business Wire

Taoglas Unveils First Embedded 4X4 MIMO Antenna for IoT and M2M Applications that Delivers High Speed Wi-Fi Throughput

03

Embedded Computing Design

Taoglas Unveils Embedded 4X4 MIMO Antenna for IoT and M2M Applications

April 2014

07

EDN Network

Design Verification Testing of GPS Receivers

October 2013

17

M2M Evolution

Taoglas Unveils Connected Road Marker, M2M Diagnostic Tool